Why argue? Customer venting!

We are trained to “overcome” objections. Were trained to “ABC” -Always Be Closing, take no prisoners, and to be aggressive. This attitude is amazing for building urgency and getting goals accomplished. This aggressive mentality automatically gives us the idea that we always need to win at all causes. This can be a major flaw with sales professionals that push their client to become hostile. Arguing with your potential clients and winning is a great way to feel good about yourself and win the battle but, you very well might lose the war.

 

The best sales professionals recognize when a customer is just arguing for the same reason. Clients love to argue to prove a point that you might not agree with. Sometimes they might argue to prove a point that they do not agree with. This is “Venting” and if you can recognize that your client is just venting it should be easy for you to just take a deep breath and agree with them. This will help them lower their emotional level down to a level for making clear and concise decisions about you, your company, and your product.

 

Here are some thoughts to keep in mind when dealing with a client who is too emotional and who likes to argue.

Agreeing with your client is not the end of the argument:

 Every time you agree with a point that you do not agree with, you are going to get emotional and want to press the issue or matter into further conversation. This is a way clients get you out of your game and onto a path that does not lead in winning the sale. Agreeing with your client helps them understand that you acknowledge their concern no matter how ridiculous it might be. It will help them bring down their thought process to a logical and more stable level. Then following up with a proven point or concrete point will help them slowly and logically come back to earth.

 Putting your tail between your legs:

Being bold and aggressive, we never like to admit that we might be wrong or that we might have lost. This is like giving up a pawn in chess to complete a stronger move later. Being able to admit that you might have lost that point helps your client see that you truly want to work through their concerns and in doing so you might have just strayed from the path a bit. But this will help your client understand that you are always willing to try another option and those speed bumps are part of the process.

Letting your client speak:

Sometimes you just need to back off and let your client speak. Top sales professionals do more listening to their clients and less talking or pitching about their product. Some sales professionals don’t realize that clients want to hear about themselves and talk about themselves more than they want to hear from you, your company, or your product. This sale might be about your paycheck but is not about you at all. The sale is about your client and your client only. Keep this in mind and ask yourself who is doing most of the talking?

 Asking leading questions is a great way to help an emotional person think about their actions:

 If you find yourself with a client that does not stop talking you will realize that sometimes they can talk themselves into a different direction that you have intended for them. Asking leading questions is a great way to put a thought into your client’s head that will lead them down the right path. Ask yourself how they would respond to this question. Asking is always less intrusive than telling when needed.

 Staying calm: 

This is important in every agreement. This is the first step to actually winning an argument. Just understand that if your calm your brain is running off of too much emotion to make a logical and clear decision. This causes illogical and emotional fights during an argument that cloud judgment and supports poor decision making. Being able to keep yourself calm and clear even if your client is not, is a great way to logically win most arguments if you are armored with product knowledge. Take a deep breath and ask yourself how you could work through this logically and clearly.

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